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Notes for John Bittick

September 13, 1781, John Bittick born [see Heirlooms--Francis & Mary Bittick Bible Record]

1810, signed Louisiana Territory, Land Petition, Section 14 [see Other Documents--1810 Louisiana Territory Petition to Land Commissioners]

abt. 1810, married Hannah McCourtney in St. Charles, Missouri

1814, During the War of 1812, John McCourtney served 65 days as a substitute for his brother-in-law, John Bittick(Bedtick/Biddick). He was mustered in at Saint Charles April 1814 under Captain Herald or Teral & Colonel McNear. Also in 1814, John Bittick served 60 days as a substitute for John McCourtney under Captain McCoughlow & Lieutenant Inks. [see Other Documents--John McCourtney Pension]

Abt. 1816, Moved family to Jefferson Co. & settled on Big River across from & below town of Brynesville (see below, excerpt from Jefferson County in Story & Pictures by Mary Joan Boyer]

July 6, 1816, p2, col 3: Missouri Gazette--letter for John Bittick advertised in St Louis PO [This John Bittick?]

September 14, 1819, John Bicets signed Petition to the President by Inhabitants of the Howard Land District, [present day Franklin County, Missouri] Louisiana-Missouri Territory, to replace Henry Carroll as Land Register [This John Bittick?] [ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ar/misc/Pet8.txt]

December 12, 1827 at Herculaneum [St Louis or Jefferson Co in 1827?]--John Beddix buys items at the John Pyeatt estate sale [see below]

1830, Jefferson County, Missouri, Merrimac Township [census]

December 22, 1832, Jefferson County, Missouri, sold horses, calves, hogs, corn & oats to Samuel Herrington [see below]

1850, Jefferson County, Missouri, District 42, Carpenter [census]

1860, Jefferson County, Missouri, Merrimac Township [census]

Aft. 1860, died in Jefferson County, Missouri

Military Service: War of 1812 [see Other Documents--John McCourtney Pension]

John was named as a son of Francis in the letter Samuel Guinn Bittick wrote in 1890 [see Heirlooms-1890 Samuel Guinn Bittick Letter, page 1 & 3].
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State Historical Society of Missouri, Newspaper Collection Index:
http://shs.umsystem.edu/newspaper/index.shtml
Bittick, John
Missouri Gazette, Jul 6, 1816, p2, col 3: letter advertised in St Louis PO
[This John Bittick?]
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Franklin County, Missouri: Combined Land And Property: 1823, 1824, 1825:
Biddix, John

Secondary List from The Enquirer and The Republican, St. Louis:
Beltick, Thomas, Gray Township, stray [probably Thomas Stanfield Bittick]
[above from Missouri Miscellany books]
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[see Other Documents: James Bittick Biographical Sketch]
An Illustrated Historical Atlas Map of Jefferson County, Missouri: Carefully Compiled from Personal Examinations and Surveys; Published by Brink, McDonough & CO. 1876
††JAMES BITTICK†
Among the first men to settle on Big River [Jefferson County, Missouri], was John Bittick, who was born in East Tennessee, emigrated to Missouri, and settled first on the Meramec River, in St. Louis County. While living there his time was occupied in making sugar [maple] and hunting - the usual pursuits of the early pioneers of the Meramec. He married Hannah McCourtney, who lived near St. Charles. His oldest child was James Bittick, who was born on the Meramec, in St. Louis County, December 20th, 1811. About the year 1816 the family moved over into Jefferson County, and settled on Big River, a little below the present town of Byrnesville, but on the opposite side. †John Bittick afterward moved to various places, but always lived on Big River. He owned no land, and sustained himself and family mostly by hunting.

James Bittick was raised in the County. In 1831 he went to Wisconsin for the purpose of mining for lead. When the Black Hawk War broke out in 1832, he enlisted in the volunteer cavalry, served four months against the Indians, and was present at several important engagements. In 1834, he came back to Jefferson County, and in 1859 moved on his present farm in section sixteen, township forty-two, range three [S16, T. 42, R 3 - Meremac Township]. He has had three children, W.M. [Willis Marion] Bittick, John S.[John Sylvester], and William Henry Harrison Bittick. The two latter are deceased. William H. H. died in prison in St. Louis, having been made a prisoner after returning home from service in the Confederate (Priceís) Army. John S.[Sylvester] died in 1874. [added: Est. Filed for Probate 31 Oct. 1874]

W. M. Bittick [Willis Marion], the oldest son, and the only one now living, was born August thirtieth, 1836, on Big River, in Jefferson County. July 1873 he was married to Artemece Harness, the daughter of Jacob Harness. Mr. Bittick, [W. M.], served in Priceís command, on the Confederate side, during the late war. He enlisted in July, 1862. He was principally in Missouri and Arkansas. He was captured at Helena, Arkansas, July the fourth, 1863, and was a prisoner twenty-two months at Memphis and Alton, eighteen months of his imprisonment being at the latter place. He has since the war been farming, and following his trade of a blacksmith.

[This biography also appears in some Goodspeed histories and in Jefferson County, Missouri in Story & Pictures by Mary Joan Boyer, pub 1958, pages 150-151]
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Courtesy of Mary Bittick Gallano:
Jefferson County, Missouri in Story & Pictures by Mary Joan Boyer, published 1958, p. 150-151
[For complete text of this article, see Other Documents: Jefferson County, Missouri in Story and Pictures]

Among the first men to settle on Big River was John Bittick, who was born in East Tennessee, emigrated to Missouri, and settled first on the Meramec River, in St. Louis County. While living there his time was occupied in making sugar and hunting--the usual pursuits of the early pioneers of the Meramec.

John Bittick married Hannah McCourtney, who lived near St. Charles. Their oldest child was James Bittick, who was born on the Meramec, in St. Louis County, Dec 20th, 1811. About the year 1816 the family moved over to Jefferson County , and settled on Big River, a little below the town of Byrnesville, but on the opposite side. John Bittick afterward moved to various places, but always lived on Big River. He owned no land, and sustained himself and family mostly by hunting.
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Courtesy of Mary Bittick Gallano:
Jefferson Co., MO Book C, pg. 338, December 22, 1832: (spelling corrected)
Know all men by these presents, That I John Bettix for and in consideration of the sum of Eighty dollars to me in hand paid the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged have granted, bargained and sold and by these presents do give, grant, bargain and sell, convey and deliver into the actual posession of Samuel Herrington on the 22nd day of December 1832 four horse exeuteers (ver). One Mare of colt, one yearling and one two year old colt, one conceived calf and one yearling calf, forty herd of hogs (ver) four sows and three pigs. Eight yearling shoats. And one lot of corn and oats on the actual property of the said (Samuel) Herrington. To have and to hold the same the title where of I do hereby warrant and defend from myself my heirs, assigns and from all other person whatsoever to him the said (Samuel) Herrington his heirs and asigns forever. As witness my hand and seal this 22nd day of December 1832.
John x Bettix (his mark) (seal)
Witness: William Everett (son-in-law, husband of Polly?)
Recorded: 5th February 1833 C. Smith, Recorder (Chauncy Smith)
(Note: A shoat is a hog 6 months old. (Ver) means Verified. Information in ( ) added by Mary Bittick Gallano.)
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http://www.angelfire.com/ar/pyeatt/misc.html
Pyeatt Genealogy Research
Marianne Cowan Pyeatt
from History of Jefferson County, Missouri:
At House's Springs the first settlement was made by James Head, who in the year 1795 made a farm on the creek, which bears his name at the present site of House Springs. Head moved away in 1796, and was succeeded by Adam House, who moved on the place vacated by Head, raised two crops, and was killed by the Indians in The year 1800. House's Springs was named after him. After 1800 settlements were made in the Southern and Western parts of the county. A grant from the Spanish government of eight hundred arpents of lands on Big River, near Morse's Mill, made to David Delauny, bears date January, 1800. It was surveyed by the Spanish Government, January 1804. Jacob Collins settled on The north side of Big River, about two miles above Morse's Mill, in 1802. The same year he built a cabin, and raised a crop of corn. A wife and one child composed his family. Charles Prewitt cultivate the same place the following year. Jesse Benton, a married man with three children, settled on Big River, at or near the present site of Frumet, in 1804. An earlier settler on Big River was John Pyatt. In 1790 he was driven away by the Indians, but in 1800 returned to the locality he had previously settled. In 1801 he planted a crop of corn, but was again obliged to leave on account of the Indians. Some of his neighbors were killed in 1803. Pyatt was living at the same place as late as 1806. About 1802 Francis Wideman settled on the south side of Big River, near Morse's Mill, and in 1803 built a mill on the river. William Estepps located near Wideman. All the settlements on Big River, of which there were quite a number, were made under authority of Francis Valle, the Spanish Commandant at Ste. Genevieve, to Francis Wideman. Permission to settle was given by Valle to Wideman, his family and connections, with as many as he could induce to join him, provided they would locate on the frontier, fifteen miles in advance of the settlement already established. Elijah Benton, a brother-in-law of Wideman, settled on the west side of Big River, where it is crossed by the Hillsboro and Richwoods road. He built a cabin in the fall of 1804, raised a crop in 1805, and was a resident of the place as late, at least, as 1808. MERAMEC TOWNSHIP... The first farm on the west side of Big River above its mouth, was settled by James Green in the year 1809. Several years before the arrival of Green, Jacob and Christopher Shults, had located on the east side of Big River, but a short distance above its entrance into the Meramec. Ruth Wilson, the wife of L.C. Wilson of this township, is a daughter of James Green, and has been living in the county since 1809, and was a year old on first coming here with her father. John Pyatt was an early settler. He came shortly after 1800, and lived on Big River about two miles and a half above its mouth. The next settlement up the river was made by David Hilterbrand whose home was on survey #908. Abraham Hilterbrand settle survey 1999. Isaac and Jonathan were two others of the Hilterbrand family who lived in the neighborhood. The Hilterbrands were conspicuous in the early settlement of this portion of the County, and their descendants still remain. JOHN BITTICK, father of JAMES BITTICK, came to the County in 1816, and settled on the east side of Big River, a short distance below Byrnesville. The farm of H.H. Sanne, on the west side of the river and nearly opposite the Jonathan Hilterbrand claim, was first settled by Samuel Herrington about the year 1816. Abraham Johnson was remembered as an old settler at House's Springs, though his time was after that of Head and House. The name of Le Barque Creek, gives evidence that the first men who traversed this part of the County, and fixed a name to the stream, were French. The farm now owned by Joseph Sale in section fifteen, township forty-two, range three, was first opened up by William Everett. Robert Stuart, a present resident of Meramec Township, is now one of the oldest men living in Jefferson County. He came to Jefferson County in the fall of 1799 and when a small child, with his father, John Stuart, who first settled on the waters of the Plattin.
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Courtesy of Marianne Cowan Pyeatt:
http://www.angelfire.com/ar/pyeatt/JohnPest.html

John Pyeatt, estate
Benjm Pyatt, Administrator of John Piatt #406
Filed Decr 12th 1827
C Smith Clerk

Administrator's Bond dated 12 December 1827 at Herculaneum. [St Louis or Jefferson Co in 1827?]
List of Sales
A list of articles sold by Benjamin pyeatte on the 31st December 1827
John Beddix to an oven 2.87 1/8
John Biddic to hammer & trowel .62 1/2
John biddic to flat irons 1.62
Simeon biddic trap & pail 2.37 1/2
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1830 Merrimac Township, Jefferson Co, Missouri, p126, line 2:
John Biddicks - 2220001/110201
2m -5 c1825-30 = Francis c1829
c1815-30 = Simeon c1825-30
2m 5-10 c1820-25 = Perry c1822
c1820-25 = William c1825-30
2m 10-15 c1815-20 = Willis Henry b1817
c1815-20 = James b1811
1m 40-50 c1780-90 = John b1781
1f -5 c1825-30 = unknown
1f 5-10 c1820-25 = Margaret
2f 15-20 c1810-15 = unknown
c1810-15 = Mary c1810-13
1f 30-40 c1790-1800 = Hannah McCourtney c1794
[10 children born before 1830 = 6 sons and 4 daughters unless some of them are his siblings or relatives.]

1840 Jefferson Co, Missouri, p98, line 6:
John Bidix - 0211/none - odd no females?
2m 5-10 c1830-35 =
1m 10-15 c1825-30 =
1m 15-20 c1820-25 =
[this canít be John Bittick b1781 - unless the enumerator didn't complete this entry]
Note: William Everett - line 5 [md Mary Polly Bittick]
John Bidix - line 6
Catherine Bidix - line 24 [widow of Simeon Bittick, brother of John Bittick]

1850 District 42, Jefferson Co, Missouri 16 September 1850, p446b:
#603/603 John Bittick 55 m w carpenter Mo
Hannah 45 f w Mo
Salinda 15 f w Mo [c1835]
Marinda 12 f w Mo [c1838]
Sarah 10 f w Mo [c1840]
Margaret 18 f w Mo [c1832]

1860 Merrimac Township, Jefferson Co, Missouri 03 July 1860, sheet 68, p616:
#542/542 John Bittick 79 m farmer $-/300 NC
Hannah 61 f Ky
Maranda Maupin 23 f seamstress Mo [c1837]

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